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12 Ghost Towns In Mississippi [MAP]

    ghost towns in Mississippi

    If you’re searching for ghost towns in Mississippi, we’ve got you covered! Below are 10 different ghost towns you can explore across Mississippi along with their status and exact GPS coordinates.

    We rate ghost towns in Mississippi based on their status. Here’s how our system works:

    • Abandoned: Is abandoned with ruins and structures in a decayed state. Great for urban explorers.
    • Historic: Preservation efforts have been made and sometimes plaques installed. Great for everyone.
    • Barren: Almost nothing remains of the town. Ideal for metal detectorists.
    • Commercial: Is commercially owned with amenities, restaurants, and stores. Great for families.
    • Semi-Abandoned: Abandoned areas with a small population in the area.
    • Privately Owned: Tours might be available but not open to the general public.


    1. Electric Mills

    32.76929, -88.46392
    Status: Semi-Abandoned

    History:

    Kicking off our list of ghost towns in Mississippi is the buzzing town of Electric Mills. The ghost town of Electric Mills in Mississippi was the first electric lumber mill east of the Mississippi River. The mill supplied free electric lights to the community.

    The town also had a church, men’s club, school, hospital, and two hotels. It also had several shops and a train depot. After the mill closed, residents left the town. The last house was demolished in 1999.

    What’s Left?

    The town is still populated, with a small lumber mill in operation, a few houses, and street signs. The town still has a street grid and street signs, though the roads are gravel. In some places, you can still find a shack where people lived. The town has a museum with artifacts of the past. Its museum displays the history of the mill and its community.


    2. Gainesville

    30.35102, -89.63978
    Status: Abandoned

    Photo Credit: Nasa.gov

    History:

    In the mid-19th century, Gainesville was a bustling port town on the Pearl River. After the railroads were built through the area, Gainesville went into decline. In 1962, NASA purchased the town’s land and opened the Stennis Space Center. Now, the town is a solitary tourist attraction, but its history is still well worth exploring.

    What’s Left?

    Today a few buildings remain, as well as a few historical markers. Gainesville is a charming little place that certainly has one of the more unique stories of all the ghost towns in Mississippi.


    3. Commerce

    34.81787, -90.37093
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    Once a thriving river port, Commerce is now a ghost town in Mississippi.  The town was devastated by a tornado in 1955, which destroyed a row of tenant houses, a church, and a cotton gin. Tragically, most of the dead were children and teachers.

    What’s Left?

    Today, the only buildings remaining are a few ramshackle cabins and a Greek-Gothic revival church. The Baptist Church closed its doors years ago and has been surrounded by woods and a ramshackle cabin. Commerce is one of many ghost towns in Mississippi that have been devastated by tornados.


    4. Dogtown

    34.26482, -89.2859
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    A trip to Dogtown, Mississippi is like exploring a museum in a small town. Not much is documented about Dogtown, however, there are still plenty of buildings to checkout in the area.

    What’s Left?

    Dogtown is located in Lafayette County, just southeast of Oxford. The town used to have a school, but now all that is left is the White’s Grocery. You can also see remnants of the Wampanoag people who lived here into the 17th century.


    5. Rodney

    31.86127, -91.19983
    Status:
    Abandoned

    History:

     The town of Rodney was once one of the largest river ports between New Orleans and St. Louis. But in the 1870s, a sand bar formed in the river, changing the course of the Mississippi River. Trains had trouble climbing the steep hills, which led the town to move inland, and by the end of the century, the town was three miles from the river. The decline of the cotton trade in the years following World War II hurt the town even more.

    What’s Left?

    After slavery ended, slaves moved out of the area. In 1930, the state deemed the town an official town, but it has since suffered devastating floods and continued to lose its inhabitants. The last flood that swept through the town in 2011 washed away most of the town’s structures. The silver dome of the Greek Gothic revival church still stands tall, and the cemetery has 200 tombs dating back to 1828. Even though it’s now overgrown, visitors can marvel at the architecture of this historic town.


    6. Zama

    32.975, -89.38
    Status: Abandoned

    Photo Credit: misspreservation.com

    History:

    Zama was a thriving port city in the 19th century that faded from existence when residents shifted from using steamboats to relying on automobiles.

    What’s Left?

    Today, Zama is a ghost town where a visitor can see the remnants of a bygone era. The ghost town is a must-see destination for anyone who loves history and old-fashioned hospitality. Explorers can still find the remains of the old gym as well as various homes and a school in town.


    7. Bankston

    33.39684, -89.36797
    Status: Barren

    History:

     This town was founded in 1848 and was the site of Mississippi’s first textile mill. Its relative isolation kept it relatively safe during the Civil War, and its mill was one of the few remaining sources of cloth for the Confederacy. In 1864, Union scouts reported the activity of the mill.

    What’s Left?

     After the Civil War, the town began a slow decline. It suffered two devastating fires and was struck by yellow fever epidemics in 1843 and 1898. Today, the town is a ghost town, and still gives off ghostly vibes of this once vibrant community.


    8. Old Americus

    30.70935, -88.59585
    Status: Barren

    History:

    Old Americus was once the first county seat in Mississippi, but today there’s no trace of any settlement ever existing. The town was a small rural settlement that primarily farmed and thrived from the natural resources in the area.

    Sadly in 1826 a drive destroyed many buildings including the local government building, driving almost everyone out of town.

    What’s Left?

    Nothing remains of the town except the old road that once led up to Americus.


    9. Holmesville

    31.20351, -90.3087
    Status: Historic

    History:

    Holmesville, Mississippi is a small town that was once a bustling center of commerce. It was founded in 1816, a year before the state was established. It was named after a soldier who died in battle many miles from the town. The town’s population dwindled over the years, but the locals have preserved many buildings before their ruin.

    What’s Left?

    Holmesville is one of the few ghost towns in Mississippi that is designated as historic and protected. Visitors can check out various buildings around town and even stay at a few bed and breakfasts located in town.


    10. Fort Adams

    31.08638, -91.54805
    Status: Semi-Abandoned

    History:

    The area around Fort Adams was first established in 1798 as a small river port town that controlled the port of entry on the Mississippi river. the area was officially named Fort Adams after the United States and Spain settled on territory boundaries.

    Fort Adams is also known for being the place where the Choctaw and the US government signed the Treaty of Fort Adams.

    What’s Left?

    Today urban explorers can find many old churches as well as various cemeteries and abandoned homes in the area.


    Go out and explore!

    That concludes our list of ghost towns in Mississippi but that doesn’t mean that’s all there is to find. Take the back roads, follow train tracks, and find some places for yourself. There are plenty of places I kept off this list so get out there and explore.

    If you’re having trouble finding ghost towns be sure to check out our Ultimate Guide to Finding Abandoned Places, or explore other ghost towns across the country.