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27 Ghost Towns In Arizona [MAP]

    ghost towns in Arizona

    If you’re searching for ghost towns in Arizona, we’ve got you covered! Below are 27 different ghost towns you can explore across the great state of Arizona along with their status and exact GPS coordinates.

    We rate ghost towns in Arizona based on their status. Here’s how our system works:

    • Abandoned: Is abandoned with ruins and structures in a decayed state. Great for urban explorers.
    • Historic: Preservation efforts have been made and sometimes plaques installed. Great for everyone.
    • Barren: Almost nothing remains of the town. Ideal for metal detectorists.
    • Commercial: Is commercially owned with amenities, restaurants, and stores. Great for families.
    • Semi-Abandoned: Abandoned areas with a small population in the area.
    • Privately Owned: Tours might be available but not open to the general public.


    1. Adamsville

    33.012778, -111.441944
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    You may have heard of Adamsville, Arizona, if you’ve ever been to Arizona. It used to be a thriving farm town in the late 1800s, but it was quickly abandoned after the Gila River flooded the town.

    The town was founded by Fred A. Adams, a man from New Mexico. It was founded in 1866 and later moved to the Salt River Valley. The Bichard brothers, a prominent business family in the Gila Valley, built a modern flouring mill there and opened several stores. The town was the center of activity in the Gila Valley, and despite its small size, it was the center of life in the Gila Valley.

    What’s Left?

    In the 1920s, the town’s population dwindled to almost nothing, and it now exists solely as a ghost town. At an elevation of 1,450 feet, it’s located on the south bank of the Gila River, west of Florence. Urban explorers can find an old cemetery along with numerous ruins of the past.


    2. Agua Caliente

    32.985278, -113.324444
    Status: Abandoned

    ghost town in Arizona that are abandoned

    History:

    Agua Caliente in Arizona is an abandoned resort. During the 1930s, the resort was a popular spot for tourists, and the population was largely White. During the 1940s, the town was consolidated into three districts.

    The population was reported to be at its lowest point since the early 1940s. Today, the ruins of the old resort are visible, and there are a few signs of life scattered throughout the town.

    What’s Left?

    Agua Caliente was originally named after a natural hot spring. The springs were used by Native Americans and later by white settlers who were drawn to their soothing properties.

    The town thrived as a Wild West town and a tourist destination, but eventually, farming and irrigation took their toll on the springs. A visit to the Pioneer Cemetery in Agua Caliente will give you a taste of life in the 19th century. Today, visitors can still visit the Pioneer Cemetery, which is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.


    3. Alto

    31.62062, -110.87613
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    When you visit Alto, Arizona, you will find more than ruins. The town’s history is interesting as Alto was once home to the first female postmaster in the United States, Minnie Bond. It’s worth the adventure and a trip to Alto, Arizona.

    What’s Left?

    Explorers can expect to find numerous ruins located along the isolated stretch of the Arizona desert. There’s a campsite right outside of the ruins, making this one of the best ghost towns in Arizona to camp at.


    4. Bellevue

    33.33194, -110.94333
    Status: Abandoned

    ghost towns in Arizona that used to be boo towns
    Photo Credit: prestonm.com

    History:

    This town sits five miles south of Miami, Arizona. It’s home to a small community that’s been abandoned for decades. It’s also a great place to learn about Arizona’s history. Today, you can visit Bellevue, Arizona, and explore its eerie remains.

    What’s Left?

    In the 1880s, mining operations began in the area. By 1925, the town had reached its largest population, of about 300 people. The town had a post office, an assay office, and two newspapers. However, by 1927, several mines had closed and left the community with only a few residents. If you want to pay a visit, you’re going to see the remains of the Gibson Copper mill and some ore piles.


    5. Bonita

    32.58957, -109.96939
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    When you travel through Arizona, you may come across numerous abandoned towns. While some of them have interesting stories to tell, others are simply eerie and leave no lasting impression. You may be looking for a pit stop on your trip to Bonita.

    What’s Left?

    Bonita is an intriguing ghost town located in Graham County. You can reach it via a dirt road that offers breathtaking views and plenty of opportunities for wildlife viewing. This is why visitors should be extra cautious and prepare themselves before going on their journey.


    6. Cedar

    34.778611, -113.794444
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    Whether you want to learn about the history of mining in the area or experience a unique view of the old west, Arizona has a large number of ghost towns. One of the ghost towns in Arizona is Cedar. The first post office in the Cedar was established in 1895. After that, mail was forwarded to the nearby Yucca District.

    What’s Left?

    The rock ruins and mining remnants of this Arizona ghost town are extensive. The town lies in a canyon, so the area is quite dense. While exploring the ruins of this ghost town, you may be surprised to see a large number of abandoned buildings.


    7. Cerbat

    35.303056, -114.139722
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    The history of the Cerbat ghost town in Arizona is filled with intriguing stories. The town was founded in the early 1860s and grew into a town before going completely ghostly. In 1877, Cerbat was the county seat until being elected to Mineral Park.

    What’s Left?

    Today, the area surrounding Cerbat is home to a cemetery. The cemetery is situated adjacent to the ghost town, but it requires a high-clearance vehicle to get to it. However, the experience is well worth it.


    8. Cerro Colorado

    31.658889, -111.2725
    Status: Abandoned

    Photo Credit: arbyreed – flickr.com

    History:

    The mining district at Cerro Colorado is 55 miles southwest of Tucson on the Arivaca Road, between Amado and Arivaca. The town is well known for the massacre of mining workers by Mexican outlaws and its buried treasure. It is named after the nearby Cerro Colorado Mine, famous for its high-grade surface silver.

    What’s Left?

    It is a largely abandoned mining town located near the Arivaca Road in southern Arizona. The rich deposits sparked the growth of small towns but ultimately led to the demise of mining operations. A trip to these eerie towns will give you a fascinating look at the Wild West past.


    9. Harshaw

    31.46752, -110.7075
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    Located in the Coronado National Forest, Harshaw, Arizona, was a boomtown during the gold and silver booms of the early 1900s. Its population dwindled as the price of silver fluctuated. In 1963, the Forest Service attempted to help the residents leave the town by facilitating a plan to relocate them to a better location. However, the efforts were unsuccessful, and only a handful of people remained.

    What’s Left?

    Located just south of Patagonia, Harshaw is one of Arizona’s most intriguing Ghost towns. A majority of the town is vacant, but a small number of buildings remain. A small mine once grew in the area, producing about a thousand tons of silver per year.


    10. Hilltop

    31.99444, -109.2775
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    If you’re interested in history, the Hilltop Ghost Towns in Arizona are just what you need. The town was abandoned after the mine closed in the late 1920s. You can still visit some remnants of the town today, including the old schoolhouse. This abandoned mining town and historic buildings make for an exciting fall visit.

    What’s Left?

    While exploring the town, keep in mind that the town is not safe and should only be visited with an experienced guide. But be careful as some of the buildings and structures are still open to the public.


    11. Lochiel

    31.33565, -110.62397
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    While the old towns of Arizona are a great place to go for a nostalgic vacation, they may not be for everyone. In Arizona, one ghost town is Lochiel, a tiny town accessed by a dirt road. While many people are interested in the past, others simply want to travel back in time to see what life was like at the former border crossing.

    What’s Left?

    The drive will provide you with some amazing scenery and great wildlife spotting opportunities. While you’re there, you might even come across some ancient buildings. You can explore the town’s abandoned buildings depending on the time of day.


    12. Ruby

    31.46176, -111.23707
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    If you’ve never visited the Ruby ghost town in Arizona, you’re missing out! This beautiful ghost town was abandoned in 1941, but it’s still home to some buildings that the mining company left behind.

    What’s Left?

    The best way to find this quaint and well-preserved Arizona ghost town is to drive a few miles from Arivaca, AZ. The road turns to dirt about halfway through the trip, but it’s well maintained and driveable. The abandoned mine left behind a mercantile, three-room school, playground, and other structures.


    13. Sasco

    32.52953, -111.44242
    Status: Abandoned

    Photo Credit: azoffroad.net

    History:

    The Sasco ghost town in Arizona is a small, little-known mining town. Named after the Southern Arizona Smelting Company, Sasco was established in 1907 and operated until 1921. Sasco’s history is intriguing, and you should try to visit it when you’re in the area.

    What’s Left?

    Despite its vanishing past, Sasco has some interesting ruins to explore. Although the ruins of the mining operation are still present, you can still see the old post office, hotel, and all other buildings associated with a mining operation. The plain concrete headstones are also some of the remaining. You may be able to spot a few of them on the ruins.


    14. Swansea

    34.17001, -113.84604
    Status: Abandoned

    Photo Credit: PS Hiker – flickr.com

    History:

    One of the best-preserved ghost towns in Arizona is Swansea. Located in the middle of nowhere, this abandoned town is well preserved. It used to be a thriving mining town and once had an extensive copper and gold mining company. However, the town eventually went out of business due to the dry climate and lack of water resources.

    What’s Left?

    The town is home to some fascinating ruins that can be explored and is a great place to photograph the desert landscape. Today, the town is a BLM-managed place, where visitors can walk through its abandoned buildings and read information plaques.


    15. Duquesne

    31.382453, -110.675328
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    The “downtown” of Duquesne is a quaint little town that has been abandoned for nearly 100 years. It was once a thriving mining town. The forested area off Duquesne Road is littered with abandoned mines, dilapidated structures, and even a hotel.

    What’s Left?

    The “Duquesne Ghost town” once boasted many buildings, including the headquarters of the Westinghouse Electric Company and the Bonanza Mine. There are also several ruins of homes and businesses, including the house once owned by George Westinghouse. The ruins of many other buildings can be seen, including a boarding house, brothel, and an old cemetery.


    16. Weaver

    34.155, -112.70694
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    Weaver was a gold mining town that was settled after the discovery of gold in 1863. It was named after Pauline Weaver, a mountain man, trapper, military scout, and prospector who led a group of explorers into the mountains in search of gold.

    Pauline Weaver’s group struck gold on Rich Hill, which lies on the east side of the town. The rich gold deposit in the area drew prospectors to the town, and Pauline Weaver was Arizona’s first white citizen. She made her home on the hill, which still houses the cemetery.

    What’s Left?

    Weaver is one of the few ghost towns in Arizona plentiful with old crumbling homes and ruins. Explorers and photographers alike will enjoy exploring the remnants of this old town.


    17. Big Bug

    34.315, -112.066667
    Status: Barren

    barren ghost towns in Arizona

    History:

    In 1862, Big Bug was home to one hundred people. However, the town was eventually abandoned and is now a recreation area located in the Prescott National Forest. You must drive to the town center and use the GPS coordinates to get there to find it.

    One of the oldest ghost towns in Arizona is Big Bug. The town was established in 1862 by Theodore Boggs, who was born in Missouri and came west with his family during the American Civil War. Boggs and his family settled in the area along Big Bug Creek, which was named for the size of the bugs living in the region.

    What’s Left?

    After spending several days exploring the town, you can head back to Prescott and check out the old mining camp at Providence. This ghost town is well-known for its historical significance to the area. Today almost nothing is left, but hobbyists might find relics buried where the town once stood.


    18. Obed

    34.916111, -110.323611
    Status: Barren

    History:

    The Obed ghost town in Arizona is a fascinating place to visit for those who love history and vintage black-and-white photos. These photos give an insight into the days when the town flourished as a bustling transportation hub and stage line to the silver mines. You can learn more about its colorful past by visiting the ghost town.

    What’s Left?

    If you’ve never visited a ghost town, you are missing out on a unique and beautiful experience. These abandoned towns once had bustling streets full of people hoping to strike it rich.

    Vintage black and white photos from the past are a great way to get a glimpse into a different time and place. You can follow in the footsteps of fellow fortune seekers or even visit military forts and mining towns. Obed is one of eight ghost towns in Southern Arizona that you cannot afford to miss.


    19. Goldfield

    33.45724, -111.49188
    Status: Commercial

    History:

    The Goldfield Ghost town in Arizona is a reconstructed 1890s town where you can tour a gold mine, watch Old West gunfights, or visit the history museum. The town is a must-see if you’re interested in gold and the state’s history. To make the most of your trip, book early to avoid crowds.

    This historic mining town is full of surprises and will make you want to come back again. This desert town is truly worth a visit. It’s worth every minute! If you’re looking for something different from a typical tourist attraction, visit Goldfield Ghost Town!

    What’s Left?

    When you’re ready for some ghostly entertainment, head out to Goldfield Ghost Town in Arizona. This ghost town is hidden in the Arizona desert, but it isn’t too far from civilization. The town is also close to the Superstition Mountains, and you’ll be rewarded with beautiful views of this desert oasis.


    20. Jerome

    34.7585, -112.1239
    Status: Commercial

    History:

    If you love the history of old mining towns, you’ll love visiting the ghost towns in Arizona. From Jerome to Cedar, there’s something for every kind of traveler. The ghost towns of Arizona are full of history, and the towns were once bustling cities with vibrant art and entertainment scenes. While visiting Arizona ghost towns, make sure to take the time to visit Jerome.

    What’s Left?

    A visit to a ghost town in Arizona can be unnerving, with shaky porches and rusty elements. You may also come across snakes and bees. If you aren’t careful, you could encounter scorpions and rattlesnakes. Always take precautions while visiting these ghost towns. There’s no way to tell if you will run into any sinister beings, but you can certainly enjoy a visit to this abandoned town.


    21. Castle Dome Landing

    32.965, -114.463611
    Status: Abandoned

    famous ghost towns in Arizona

    History:

    While the town is now a ghost town, it was once a bustling community, and the first American settlers discovered evidence of mining here during the 1860s. Visit the ruins of the old mining town of Castle Dome Landing, located northeast of Yuma, Arizona, for an informative self-guided tour.

    The mining town of Castle Dome Landing is a true example of mining history in this region. Its post office opened on December 17, 1875, and closed one years later. The mines were reopened in 1890, and within a few years, they became significant sources of lead for World War I and World War II.

    What’s Left?

    The mining camp was later renamed “Castle Dome” as it served as a transport depot for steamboats traveling up the Colorado River from Yuma. In addition, the landing was a shipping and supply point. Travelers from Yuma would stop in the town, and it became a party town during Mexican Independence Day. For a time, it rivaled Yuma and was almost an independent city. Now you can visit this museum and observe many aspects of that time.


    22. Chloride

    35.41395, -114.19859
    Status: Historic

    Most well known ghost towns in Arizona
    Photo Credit: Jimmy Emerson, DVM – flickr.com

    History:

    The mining town of Chloride is considered one of the best-preserved ghost towns in the country. It is the oldest mining operation in the state and was established in 1862. The town’s population peaked at around three thousand during its heyday, but by the late 20th century, it was only home to about four hundred people. During the 1940s, WWII depleted the town’s manpower, and the town was left with little to show for it.

    What’s Left?

    The town of Chloride, Arizona, is making a comeback, thanks to tourism. The town’s murals, which Roy Purcell painted in the 1960s, are still bright and colorful, despite the desert climate. In fact, there’s an entire museum which is worth a visit. You’ll see the murals in the original colors for the most part. It’s easy to see why Chloride is so popular among tourists.


    23. Klondyke

    32.83534, -110.33231
    Status: Historic

    History:

    A one-day trip from Tucson is the Klondyke ghost town in Arizona. It is located near the eastern entrance to Aravaipa Canyon, and its roads remain unpaved today. Back in 1905, the town had about 500 people and featured a school, church, saloon, and a wooden store.

    Like many ghost towns in Arizona, the town slowly died off as the lead and silver mines dried up

    What’s Left?

    Today Klondyke still has numerous abandoned houses and structures you can explore. Of all the ghost towns in Arizona, Klondyke is one of my top favorites.


    24. Oatman

    35.026389, -114.383611
    Status: Historic

    History:

    There are plenty of reasons to visit Arizona’s quaint and quirky Oatman ghost town. It’s close to Las Vegas and California, so it experiences warm weather all year round. However, you should be prepared for hotter days during the summer months, when the town becomes overcrowded. For this reason, you should plan your trip during the cooler spring and fall months.

    The Oatman Hotel is a historic town. It was a popular destination for local miners, who covered the walls with signed dollar bills. In 1939, Clark Gable and Carole Lombard honeymooned in the town.

    What’s Left?

    Visitors should make sure to visit the burros on the town’s Main Street. The “wild” burros that roam the town are descendants of the burros brought to the area by miners. Once the miners abandoned them, they became free-roaming animals.

    Nowadays, you’ll find nutritional food packets for the burros in various stores. They like to eat, so you may have to share your snacks with them. While you’re in Oatman, be aware that some of these burros have been known to stick their heads in windows.


    25. Stanton

    34.165278, -112.729444
    Status: Historic

    historic ghost towns in Arizona
    Photo Credit: Neal Du Shane – apcrp.org

    History:

    A modern-day ghost town, Stanton, Arizona, is full of eerie ghost stories. The town has a unique ghostly ambiance and offers RV hookup sites. Visitors can also explore the large desert. There is even a museum. Here, you can experience the old-time mining lifestyle.

    Before it became a recreational ghost town, Stanton was a mining/stagecoach station. In the 1890s, the town of Stanton was a legitimate community populated by miners and their families. It had a general store, a stamp mill, a hotel, and several other buildings. But when the gold ran out, the town declined. The ghosts still live there today, as the town was a great place to live during the gold rush. However, you can’t forget that the town once grew up.

    What’s Left?

    There would be much more left to explore in Stanton if it wasn’t for the hippies. IN the 1960s hippies moved in and burned a lot of the old buildings for firewood. Today a few buildings have been restored including the old dance hall and saloon.


    26. Salero

    31.58055, -110.85888
    Status: Privately Owned

    History:

    If you’re looking for a truly unique ghost town in the state of Arizona, you should check out Salero, Arizona. This ghost town is located in Santa Cruz County and is one of the best-preserved of all the ghost towns in the state. It is not open to the public and is owned by Salero Ranch. You can still see many of the original buildings and take photos, though.

    What’s Left?

    While exploring the relics of this Arizona ghost town, you can also visit the Grand Canyon, the White Mountains, and much more. Getting lost in the past? Take a ghost town tour and learn about the history of the area! You might be surprised at how well preserved these historical places are!


    27. Vulture City

    33.8172, -112.83246
    Status: Privately Owned

    History:

    Unlike many ghost towns, Vulture City is uninhabited and unsupervised. Visitors should exercise common sense when exploring abandoned buildings and areas and wear sturdy shoes. Walking tours are available too. For a more authentic experience, consider visiting during the day. The town is only open to the public for two hours.

    What’s Left?

    Visiting the town is an ideal way to get a feel for the history of this isolated mining community. Visitors can take a walk through the ghost town, exploring historic buildings and the road. The town features saguaros, majestic sunsets, and stunning desert landscapes. You can have your vows at this haunted location and enjoy the ghostly atmosphere.


    Go out and explore!

    That concludes our list of ghost towns in Arizona, but that doesn’t mean that’s all there is to find. Take the back roads, follow train tracks, and find some places for yourself. There are plenty of places I kept off this list so get out there and explore.

    If you’re having trouble finding ghost towns be sure to check out our Ultimate Guide to Finding Abandoned Places, or explore other ghost towns across the country.