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12 Ghost Towns In Alabama [MAP]

    ghost towns in Alabama

    If you’re searching for ghost towns in Alabama, we’ve got you covered! Below are 10 different ghost towns you can explore across Alabama along with their status and exact GPS coordinates.

    We rate ghost towns in Alabama based on their status. Here’s how our system works:

    • Abandoned: Is abandoned with ruins and structures in a decayed state. Great for urban explorers.
    • Historic: Preservation efforts have been made and sometimes plaques installed. Great for everyone.
    • Barren: Almost nothing remains of the town. Ideal for metal detectorists.
    • Commercial: Is commercially owned with amenities, restaurants, and stores. Great for families.
    • Semi-Abandoned: Abandoned areas with a small population in the area.
    • Privately Owned: Tours might be available but not open to the general public.


    1. Cahaba

    32.310362, -87.103891
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    Once the state’s capital, Cahawba was a bustling antebellum river town that became a ghost town following the Civil War. Before the Civil War, it had a population of under 2,000 people. In 1900, most of the town’s residents had moved to Tuscaloosa. By that time, most of the town’s buildings had been destroyed.

    What’s Left?

    Today, only a few buildings and cemeteries remain in the town. The Alabama Historical Commission maintains the site. Ghost stories about the town abound from the 19th and 20th centuries. One such story involves a “ghostly orb” that flits over the garden maze designed by C.C. Pegues.


    2. Riverton

    34.884980, -88.078820
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    The town was a strategic point on the Tennessee River during the Civil War and was devastated by the creation of the Pickwick Dam.

    What’s Left?

    Although most of the town is underwater, the old cemetery is still visible. Riverton is one of many ghost towns in Alabama that have been submerged underwater over the years.


    3. Claiborne

    31.54016, -87.51554
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    This small town lies on a bluff above the Alabama River in Monroe County. It grew rapidly after the Creek War and was incorporated as a town in 1820. It was an important trading center and shipping port throughout the 1830s.

    Native Americans lived in the area before the town was established. Excavations revealed a Native American burial mound near the town. The remains of four people were discovered, including a skull and other bones. Copper ornaments were also discovered in the mound.

    What’s Left?

    Today only ruins and the local cemetery remains as the memory of Claiborne fades away. While there are certainly more exciting ghost towns in Alabama, you should definitely check out Caliborne if you’re nearby.


    4. Gantts Quarry

    33.148333, -86.289444
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    Gantts Quarry is one of the oldest ghost towns in Alabama, dating back to 1830 when Dr. Edward Gantt discovered marble in the area. The town extracted and sold this marble across the country, with a block of it currently a part of the Washington Monument.

    The town declined during the great depression. In 1973 the population was 456. By 1990 only seven residents remained.

    What’s Left?

    Today no one lives in Gantts Quarry. There are numerous abandoned homes and is currently one of my ghost towns in Alabama.


    5. Pikeville

    34.038056, -87.951111
    Status:
    Abandoned

    Photo Credit: Jimmy Emerson, DVM – flickr.com

    History:

    Pikeville was first settled in 1820 and served as the Marion County seat until 1882. In 1886 a fire wiped out the courthouse and trigger the downfall of the community.

    What’s Left?

    Today, little remains of Pikeville. Explorers can still find a few abandoned buildings in the area, along with the original cemetery.


    6. Bellfonte

    34.712783, -85.946971
    Status: Barren

    History:

    Bellefonte was founded in 1860 and boasted the largest population in the area at 181 residents. However, the population declined rapidly in the 1880s and by 1920, the town was abandoned.

    What’s Left?

    This ghost town rests in the shadow of the Bellefonte Nuclear Generation Station with almost nothing left behind. Vigilant explorers can find a single chimney from the local inn that once stood.


    7. Prairie Bluff

    32.134311, -87.403607
    Status: Barren

    History:

    The first maps of the area show Prairie Bluff in 1819. Its population grew quickly, largely because of river trade. By 1861, the town’s population had reached its peak. The introduction of new railroads in the area, however, had a detrimental effect on the town. It’s hard to imagine that the town still exists, despite being in ruins.

    What’s Left?

    Today, only scattered ruins of Praire Bluff can be found along the riverbank.


    8. Aigleville

    32.51664, -87.82329
    Status: Barren

    History:

    Aigleville, Alabama, otherwise known as Eagle Town, was an old settlement in Marengo County. The town was established in the late 1700s by French refugees and former Bonapartists who fled Saint-Domingue. It was part of the Vine and Olive Colony.

    What’s Left?

    Today, Aigleville is a quaint little town in the heart of the state’s countryside, but nothing remains from the original town.


    9. Arcola

    32.566389, -87.77
    Status: Historic

    History:

    It was founded by French immigrants in the early 19th century. The town is named after the Battle of Arcola, which was won by the French. But the town never reached its planned size and plantation owners eventually abandoned it to move to Greensboro.

    What’s Left?

    Today there are numerous historic buildings maintained by the township as well as a few abandoned buildings to explore in the area.


    10. Blakeley

    30.732772, -87.899508
    Status: Historic

    History:

    The area surrounding Blakeley had a long and interesting history. It was first inhabited by Paleo-Indians about 4,000 years ago. Then, in the 1500s, Europeans began to settle here. In 1813, a man named Josiah Blakeley realized the potential of the region as a seaport and purchased 7,000 acres for a town. He laid out a grand plan for the town, and in 1814, the town was incorporated.

    The Battle of Fort Blakeley was one of the largest Civil War battles in Alabama. Visitors can tour the fortifications and walk in the footsteps of the armies that fought for the town.

    What’s Left?

    Due to the bloodshed and violent history of the area, many say Blakeley is among the most haunted ghost towns in Alabama.


    Go out and explore!

    That concludes our list of ghost towns in Alabama but that doesn’t mean that’s all there is to find. Take the back roads, follow train tracks, and find some places for yourself. There are plenty of places I kept off this list so get out there and explore.

    If you’re having trouble finding ghost towns be sure to check out our Ultimate Guide to Finding Abandoned Places, or explore other ghost towns across the country.

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