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18 Ghost Towns In New Mexico [MAP]

    ghost towns in New mexico

    If you’re searching for ghost towns in New Mexico, we’ve got you covered! Below are 17 different ghost towns you can explore across the great state of Montana along with their status and exact GPS coordinates.

    We rate ghost towns in Montana based on their status. Here’s how our system works:

    • Abandoned: Is abandoned with ruins and structures in a decayed state. Great for urban explorers.
    • Historic: Preservation efforts have been made and sometimes plaques installed. Great for everyone.
    • Barren: Almost nothing remains of the town. Ideal for metal detectorists.
    • Commercial: Is commercially owned with amenities, restaurants, and stores. Great for families.
    • Semi-Abandoned: Abandoned areas with a small population in the area.
    • Privately Owned: Tours might be available but not open to the general public.


    1. Hagan

    35.31722, -106.31388
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    Hagan, New Mexico is a ghost town located in Sandoval County. This small village is approximately 13 miles southeast of San Felipe Pueblo. Located on the historic Santa Fe Trail, Hagan offers visitors a chance to explore the history of the area and experience first-hand the hardships of early settlers.

    Originally a mining camp, Hagan, New Mexico was developed around a coal mine. When the mine ceased operations, the town grew. It was eventually home to a power plant, a mercantile store, and a hotel. However, the residents soon left when the coal ran out and they couldn’t find any more trees. Today, the abandoned town is an ideal place for a visit to the past.

    When coal was discovered in the Una de Gato Arroyo, Hagan was established as a mining camp. By 1905, about 60 miners had set up camp. The town’s name was named after a local railroad official, William Hagan. In the early years of mining towns, railroad companies had a profound impact on the community’s prosperity. The Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad eventually extended its tracks to Hagan.

    What’s Left?

    Many ruins and buildings remain since the town was abandoned in the 1940s. You can find Hagan just northeast of Alburquerque.


    2. Los Cerrillos

    35.43751, -106.12459
    Status: Semi-Abandoned

    History:

    If you’re interested in gold mining history, Los Cerrillos has plenty of interesting history. The town first began as a tent camp located on the hillside between the Carbonateville and Madrid mining districts. The arrival of the railroad sparked the area’s growth. Soon, the town was populated by miners and prospectors looking for gold, silver, and other metals. It began as a tent camp and quickly expanded into an official town.

    What’s Left?

    If you’re a history buff, Los Cerrillos is the spot for you. The town isn’t strictly a ghost town, but it is still a charming little place with tree-lined streets, historic buildings, and scattered ruins across the desert. Many western films were filmed in this town, and it’s First Street is a picturesque backdrop for photos. Cerrillos Hills State Park, 0.5 miles north of town, is full of hiking trails through rolling hills.


    3. Madrid

    35.4067, -106.15252
    Status: Commercial

    History:

    Madrid was settled as early as the 1850s when residents tapped into the famous “Coal Gulch” that runs across the nearby valley. By the late 1800s, a seven-story breaker was constructed to help aid in coal extraction. During its peak, the town flourished with around 2500 people.

    What’s Left?

    Today, there are fewer than 100 residents in Madrid, one of the country’s oldest ghost towns. It is thought that a chemistry project caused the fire that destroyed the schoolhouse. The town was a center for trade and industry for decades, but now its remaining residents have transformed their town into a tourist attraction.


    4. Golden

    35.26698, -106.21391
    Status:
    Semi-Abandoned

    Photo Credit: Jenni Konrad – flickr.com

    History:

    The promise of gold and silver lured tens of thousands of treasure hunters to the rugged wilderness of New Mexico, creating a boomtown phenomenon. But with the Great Depression, World War I, and the Silver Panic, many of these boomtowns faded away. Today, these once vibrant communities are ghost towns, which retain the relics of a former thriving community and tell an intriguing history. 

    What’s Left?

    While the Ortiz Mountains grew rapidly during the 1870s, the town of Golden remained slow-paced for years. After the gold rush ended, the town lost its residents and businesses, and it became one of the state’s most famous ghost towns Today, the ruins of old buildings and businesses attract tourists from around the world. But a visit to the ruins of Golden will make you wonder if the ruins really are ghost towns.


    5. Elizabethtown

    36.61728, -105.28582
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    This mining town once boasted over 7,000 residents. Today, you can see only a handful of the abandoned buildings from a time when the town was alive. The town was built near Moreno Valley and Baldy Mountain for its close proximity to natural resources underground. 

    The town’s population fluctuated throughout the years, as the area was plagued by harsh winters. In its heyday, the town grew with each new ore discovery but declined once the gold had run out. Meanwhile, hardy settlers had to deal with drunks, outlaws, and Indian raids, and they had to survive harsh winters.

    What’s Left?

    Although the town is no longer thriving, some buildings have been restored. Visit the museum to learn more about the town’s history.


    6. Dawson

    36.66419, -104.77471
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    Located 17 miles northeast of Cimarron, Dawson is a ghost town in Colfax County, New Mexico. The town was the site of two coal mining disasters in 1913 and 1923. Now, it’s a ghost town with a history of famine and devastation. However, it’s a fascinating place to visit.

    Coal was discovered on the Dawson land grant in 1895. Coal mining began in the area soon after. Charles Eddy, a coal miner, founded a company and helped bring a railroad spur to the town from Tucumcari. The company continued to operate in Dawson until it was purchased in 1906 by the Phelps Dodge Corporation, which wanted to mine the coal for railroads and smelt the copper mines in Arizona.

    What’s Left?

    The town was once one of the largest company-owned mines in the American West. Its population was nearly nine thousand, and its ruins can be seen in the town’s cemetery. Unlike many ghost towns in New Mexico, there isn’t much left to see in Dawson.


    7. Loma Parda

    35.8467, -105.07583
    Status: Abandoned

    Photo Credit: el-camino-real.smugmug.com

    History:

    The town of Loma Parda, New Mexico is a small settlement in the western United States. Its name means “brown hill” and refers to the town’s brownish-gray color. The town sits along the Mora River and slopes up to the west. Its surrounding hills are covered with trees. It was originally a quiet farming community in the 1830s, but changed after the opening of Fort Union.

    After the town was founded, it became a popular military base. Soldiers were able to find jobs in the town due to its saloons, dance halls, and women of ill repute. Soldiers who went AWOL were often expected to be in town. Cowboys from the Santa Fe Trail also frequented the town. The town was a hub of illegal activity. While the military was able to protect the area from the settlers, the civilian population was left to fend for themselves.

    What’s Left?

    Today the town lies in ruins, but still offers a unique look at what remains after years of abandonment.


    8. Tucumcari

    35.09555, -104.06542
    Status: Historic

    History:

    Although Tucumcari isn’t a true ghost town, it is a charming place worth visiting. The Historic District is comprised of the historic buildings that line Main Street. These include the Rock Island-Southern Pacific Train Station, which was built in 1937, and the Odeon Theatre. You’ll also find the Mesalands Dinosaur Museum, which is home to a collection of dinosaur bones. The town even has a strange relationship with pop culture, as the famous Route 66 runs through the town.

    What’s Left?

     Tucumcari is one of the numerous ghost towns in New Mexico you can visit along Route 66. Urban explorers can find old signage, abandoned vehicles, and the remains of many old buildings.


    9. Ancho

    33.93753, -105.74294
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    The population of Ancho grew significantly during the Great Depression, when families flocked to the Jicarilla Mountains to make money. The following year, U.S. 54 was built, cutting off the town by nearly two miles. The school closed, and the railroad shuttered its depot in 1959. The town’s population increased significantly over the next five years. Eventually, however, the town was able to reestablish itself.

    What’s Left?

    Explorers can find abandoned homes and numerous ruins scattered across Ancho. While there isn’t a whole lot left, Ancho provides one of the most authentic ghost town experiences in all of New Mexico.


    10. Lincoln

    33.49202, -105.38387
    Status: Semi-Abandoned

    History:

    Lincoln was known as one of the most violent ghost towns in New Mexico during the late 1800s, with infamous criminals such as Billy The Kid passing through regularly.

    What’s Left?

    Today explorers can find the ruin of the old courthouse, Tunstall Store, and Mission Church throughout the town. The town has preserved over 17 buildings for future generations and photographers, making it one of the best-preserved ghost towns in New Mexico.


    11. Lake Valley

    36.09167, -108.15729
    Status: Historic

    Photo Credit: BLM New Mexico – flickr.com

    History:

    If you are looking for a unique and interesting day trip, consider visiting one of the many ghost towns in Lake Valley, New Mexico. This historic town was once an active silver mining area located in Sierra County. Before the silver rush in 1893, Lake Valley was a thriving silver mining town. After the industry collapsed, thousands of people relocated to find work elsewhere.

    The last resident of the town passed away in 1974. This ghost town in New Mexico is now classified as a National Historic Landmark. The ghost town still retains some of its buildings, including a schoolhouse and a chapel. The Bureau of Land Management manages the area, and you can visit during regular office hours.

    What’s Left?

    Today, it is a popular tourist destination for its historic buildings and interesting history. Visitors can explore the many buildings, including a church that dates back to 1879. The Sierra County Historical Museum is located in Lake Valley, and offers information on the town’s past.


    12. Shakespeare

    32.32591, -108.73838
    Status: Historic

    History:

    Shakespeare was always a quaint little town, which started off as a rest stop for the stagecoach that ran along Mexican Springs. When silver was discovered the town briefly peaked until the mines ran dry in 1929. Back in 1881 outlaws “Russian Bill” and Sand King were lynched inside Shakespeare and left hanging for several days as a reminder that banditry would not be tolerated in town.

    What’s Left?

    Shakespear is now completely privately owned. However, the owner does occasionally open up the land for tours. The structures are wonderfully preserved, making this one of the more rare ghost towns in New Mexico.


    13. Mogollon

    33.39672, -108.79422
    Status: Semi-Abandoned

    History:

    The ghost town of Mogollon in SW New Mexico is a 9-mile detour on a side road. Visiting this town and walking down its main street is like stepping back in time. The town was founded in 1876, named after Don Juan Ignacio Flores, a Spanish governor of the region in the 1700s. Mogollon is pronounced moh-goh-YOHN. It was once a thriving mining town that was home to thousands during its golden age.

    What’s Left?

    The Mogollon, New Mexico Ghost town is located on the edge of the Gila National Forest. To reach Mogollon, visitors need to drive towards Snow Lake and the Catwalk. After reaching the Catwalk, visitors can continue the trip to the nearby town of Glenwood.  Today, this ghost town has survived numerous fires and floods due to its remote location. You’ll find a single restaurant and two curio shops. Because the roads to Mogollon are narrow and without guardrails, you should take your time and research before arriving.


    14. Pinos Altos

    32.8634, -108.22143
    Status: Commercial

    Photo Credit: Tom Blackwell – flickr.com

    History:

    A visit to the ghost town of Pinos Altos, New Mexico will rekindle your passion for the Wild West. The Occidental Hotel, a landmark from the 1800s, was a frequent haunt of the Native Americans. Today, you can still see the structure of the original saloon, the Buckhorn Saloon, which was saved from fire thirty years after the town was founded.

    What’s Left?

    Pinos Altos Historic Town will evoke the past by reliving the days when the town was booming and flourishing. Among the many attractions of the town is the Buckhorn Saloon and Opera House, which was constructed in 1860. The Silver City, which celebrates the Wild West past, has a replica of the childhood home of Billy the Kid. The town has numerous sightseeing tours run by Adelante Tours.


    15. Chloride

    33.33868, -107.67781
    Status: Historic

    Photo Credit: Larry Lamsa – flickr.com

    History:

    Chloride is easily one of the most well-known ghost towns in New Mexico thanks to its active but small population and many historic buildings still left intact. The town had more amenities than most western towns, boasting nine saloons, a butcher, a candy store, a pharmacy, and a photography studio.

    The town’s downfall would come in sync with the Silver Panic of 1893, when silver prices crashed the town never truly recovered.

    What’s Left?

    Today there’s a great mix of natural ruins, historic structures, and restored buildings like the old Dance Hall gift shop and the Pioneer Store Museum.


    16. Hanover

    32.81368, -108.08996
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    Hanover is a small town that was formed to support the workers at the nearby Hanover mines. It was named after one of the original settlers who was born in Hanover German. The original settlers mined the area during 1841 until be driven away by Apaches some three short years later.

    What’s Left?

    Not a lot remains, however, there are numerous abandoned homes and some original structures still standing. It’s unknown if the mine is still accessible.


    17. Cuervo

    35.03115, -104.40806
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    The town was founded around 1901, when the CRI&P railroad came through Guadalupe county. Cuervo, which means “crow,” is thought to have derived its name from a hill nearby.

    Cuervo began life as a cattle and sheep ranching town. During the 1910s, it was a popular watering spot for travelers on the Rio Grande.

    This grew the town population considerably. In the 1940s, the population reached 300 people, and the town kept its own post office until 2011. But that was before construction began, and a new highway cut the town in two. In 1926, the town boomed and boasted that it had two of everything – a school, a church, and a gas station. But once Route 66 and I-40 came through, the town’s population dwindled to a mere 58 residents. Nevertheless, many visitors who visit the town will find themselves in awe of its history and beauty.

    What’s Left?

    Today, there’s only a single gas station in operation, but many of the homes and buildings are still inhabited. Of all the ghost towns in New Mexico, Cuervo is my personal favorite.


    Go out and explore!

    That concludes our list of ghost towns in Montana, but that doesn’t mean that’s all there is to find. Take the back roads, follow train tracks, and find some places for yourself. There are plenty of places I kept off this list so get out there and explore.

    If you’re having trouble finding ghost towns be sure to check out our Ultimate Guide to Finding Abandoned Places, or explore other ghost towns across the country.

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