Skip to content

12 Ghost Towns In Georgia [MAP]

    ghost towns in Georgia

    If you’re searching for ghost towns in Georgia, we’ve got you covered! Below are 12 different ghost towns you can explore across Illinois along with their status and exact GPS coordinates.

    We rate ghost towns in Georgia based on their status. Here’s how our system works:

    • Abandoned: Is abandoned with ruins and structures in a decayed state. Great for urban explorers.
    • Historic: Preservation efforts have been made and sometimes plaques installed. Great for everyone.
    • Barren: Almost nothing remains of the town. Ideal for metal detectorists.
    • Commercial: Is commercially owned with amenities, restaurants, and stores. Great for families.
    • Semi-Abandoned: Abandoned areas with a small population in the area.
    • Privately Owned: Tours might be available but not open to the general public.


    1. Auraria

    34.47469, -84.02343
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    Auraria, Georgia is a ghost community located in Lumpkin County, southwest of Dahlonega. The town’s name, Auraria, comes from the Latin word for gold. The town was also known as Dean, Deans, Nuckollsville, Scuffle Town, and Scuffleville.

    Thousands of miners made their homes and businesses in Auraria before moving northward to Dahlonega. Despite the town’s ghostly reputation, it did have a General Store until 1997.

    What’s Left?

    While most of the buildings still stand, most of the town has been abandoned. Auraria is home to just 350 residents that are dispersed across the area. The most notable feature of Auraria is the old general store, which still operates to this today.


    2. Powelton

    33.42874, -82.87069
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    Powelton is possibly one of the oldest ghost towns in Georgia, dating back to the late 1700s as a small village. The area was primarily settled by natives, but this shifted as more soldiers moved north during the Revolutionary War. Powelton was officially incorporated in 1816 and was home to many affluent families.

    After the Civil War, the economy of Powelton was decimated, as it was built almost entirely on cotton and farming fueled by slave labor.

    What’s Left?

    Powelton has a few abandoned structures in the area including an old church, a general store, and a few homes. While it isn’t the most exciting of ghost towns in Georgia, you should check it out if you’re in the area.


    3. Scull Shoals

    33.73364, -83.29006
    Status: Abandoned

    Photo Credit: srs.fs.usda.gov – U.S Forest Service

    History:

    Scull Shoals was an important textile town between Savannah and Atlanta. Founded in 1784 on the banks of the Oconee River, the town was home to cotton gins, grist mills, and a four-story textile mill. It was a hub of economic activity, but it eventually suffered devastating floods and fell into ruin.

    What’s Left?

     The town’s decline led to the establishment of the Scull Shoals Experimental Forest, a historical recreation area in the Oconee National Forest. Much of the community is buried below the silt, although some buildings are still visible. Despite the loss of much of the area, the community remains a valuable example of the effects of unsustainable agricultural practices.


    4. Munnerlyn

    32.95348, -81.96206
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    Munnerlyn is an unincorporated community located in Burke County, Georgia. Incorporated in the early 1900s, Munnerlyn is home to approximately 230 people. The town’s name is a euphemism for “little mountain” and is known for its rolling hills and hidden waterfalls.

    During the early 1800s, the area was home to the Seminole and Creek Indians, which regularly raided settlers’ homes. Munnerlyn, became home to a wealthy man named Charles L. Munnerlyn who became a successful businessman that expanded his estate by establishing the Alligator Stage Line, a railroad that operated from 1830 to 1865.

    What’s Left?

    Today, urban explorers can find numerous ruins and abandoned structures, especially along the old railway.


    5. Apalachee

    33.68638, -83.43111
    Status:
    Abandoned

    Photo Credit: Kevin Stewart – flickr.com

    History:

    Apalachee was once a bustling community, but the boll weevil and depression struck hard. The town’s incorporation was revoked, but many residents were able to survive the hardship. The town still has a number of families, and a wide base of agricultural businesses including dairy farming and poultry farming.

    What’s Left?

    Today, Apalachee is a rural community that still hosts a few ghosts and a cemetery.


    6. Petersburg

    33.96333, -82.57027
    Status: Barren

    History:

    In 1786, Petersburg was established as a market in Wilkes County, Georgia. It was named for the nearby town of Petersburg, Virginia. It thrived during the Industrial Revolution, and was an important competitor of Augusta. The town was known for its hospitable residents, and for its tobacco inspection station.

    When the American Revolution broke out, the town of Petersburg, Georgia, began to decline rapidly. By 1810, its population had dwindled to about half of its original size, and by 1840, it was practically deserted. The town’s population declined because of the economic downturn. Cotton and tobacco farming were the main sources of income in the town, but tobacco became too expensive and difficult to transport. The city’s lack of transportation and railroad connections facilitated the decline.

    What’s Left?

    Today almost nothing is of Petersburg, with only some foundations just barely visible. Since Petersburg was partially located on an island, it’s one of the most inaccessible ghost towns in Georgia.


    7. Griswoldville

    32.86932, -83.45982
    Status: Historic

    Photo Credit: gpb.org

    History:

    In the early nineteenth century, Griswoldville was a center for the Confederate war effort. It produced the highest quality Confederate Colt copy of the war. Its strategic importance increased after Captain Ladd arrived in the town, where he was met by enemy pickets on the road. After the army had fled, Ladd and his company attacked Griswoldville.

    The Union army was forced to flee Griswoldville, but Captain Ladd swung around to charge into town and drive the enemy out. The Confederate soldiers had burned down the public buildings, and destroyed the railroad, leading to the ultimate demise of the town.

    What’s Left?

    Today not much remains outside of the historic plaques and barren battlefield. Metal detectorists might be able to find old musket balls and other remnants of the past.


    8. Fowlstown

    30.80269, -84.54713
    Status: Semi-Abandoned

    History:

    Fowlstown is one of many living ghost towns in Georgia with only a few dozen people living in the area. The post office first opened in 1883, and still operates to this day.

    What’s Left?

    Today, you’ll find many old homes, an abandoned school, and a vacant general store in town along with active residents scattered in the area.


    9. Edge Hill

    33.15277, -82.6242
    Status: Semi-Abandoned

    History:

    Edge Hill has a population of just 24 people making it the smallest ghost town in Georgia. In the past, the Edge Hill Community was referred to as Jule Wilcher Quarters, because its only resident was Mrs. J.C.A. Wilcher. Her maiden name was Sara Sallie Madison, a descendant of the founder of Madison. She married the Honorable J.C.A. Wilcher in 1850, and they continued to live in the town for a number of years.

    What’s Left?

    The town once boasted a large brick school, which is now covered in vines and will likely succumb to the elements in the near future. It still bears the typical wood stove cover and the remains of kerosene lamps. Explorers can check out the cemetery and cross


    10. Seville

    31.96045, -83.601
    Status: Semi-Abandoned

    Photo Credit: ghsbp.wordpress.com

    History:

    Seville was first settled in the late 1800s and was named after Seville, a town in Spain. The town had lost a lot of its population during the 1950s causing many of its schools to close, and teachers to leave. With little education and opportunity in town, more people left.

    What’s Left?

    Around 200 people call this town home, but that number is fading fast. While there are certainly more desolate ghost towns in Georgia, Seville is one to keep your eye on in the coming years.


    11. Orchard Hill

    33.1865, -84.2113
    Status: Semi-Abandoned

    History:

    Not much is documented online in regards to the history of Orchard Hill. We know the town was incorporated in 1912 and is still alive today with just over 200 people living in it.

    What’s Left?

    The historic town of Orchard Hill is located about 50 miles outside of Atlanta. The town is famous for its peaches, which are grown in the area’s orchards. The town is also home to Julian Jones Park, a fifteen-acre park that transforms into a winter wonderland during the holidays, with lighted holiday displays all around the walking trail.

    While Orchard Hill is one of the more active ghost towns in Georgia, explorers can still find old buildings and ruins from the past on the outskirts of town.


    12. Oketeyeconne

    31.64305, -85.08055
    Status: Underwater

    History:

    The history of Oketeyeconne dates back to the late 1700s. The Hitchiti people occupied the town, which was located on the eastern bank of the Chattahoochee River, south of Sandy Creek.

    The town was also associated with the Muskogee-speaking Creek Confederation and Seminole-speaking Yamasee Mikasuki people. Archaeologists have discovered evidence of indigenous peoples along the river dating back to 1000 B.C.

    What’s Left?

    Eventually, the town would be evacuated and abandoned to make room for the Walter F George Reservoir. While former residents took as much as they could, any structures left behind now sit at the murky bottom of the lake. This is one of the few ghost towns in Georgia that were flooded, so bring your scuba gear if you’re interested in exploring.


    Go out and explore!

    That concludes our list of ghost towns in Georgia but that doesn’t mean that’s all there is to find. Take the back roads, follow train tracks, and find some places for yourself. There are plenty of places I kept off this list so get out there and explore.

    If you’re having trouble finding ghost towns be sure to check out our Ultimate Guide to Finding Abandoned Places, or explore other ghost towns across the country.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published.