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22 Ghost Towns In Oregon [MAP]

    ghost towns in Oregon

    If you’re searching for ghost towns in Oregon we’ve got you covered! Below are 22 different ghost towns you can explore across the great state of Oregon along with their status and exact GPS coordinates.

    We rate ghost towns in Oregon based on their status. Here’s how our system works:

    • Abandoned: Is abandoned with ruins and structures in a decayed state. Great for urban explorers.
    • Historic: Preservation efforts have been made and sometimes plaques installed. Great for everyone.
    • Barren: Almost nothing remains of the town. Ideal for metal detectorists.
    • Commercial: Is commercially owned with amenities, restaurants, and stores. Great for families.
    • Semi-Abandoned: Abandoned areas with a small population in the area.
    • Privately Owned: Tours might be available but not open to the general public.


    1. Whitney

    44.659, -118.2902
    Status: Abandoned

    Photo Credit: State Archives – sos.oregon.gov

    History:

    Whitney was once a bustling logging town, located approximately half a mile south of Highway 7, between McEwan and Austin. The Nibley Lumber Company established a large sawmill south of town in 1911, and the population increased to as many as 150 people. The town was home to a saw mill that supplied lumber to surrounding gold mines. The town’s population never topped 100 people, however, and eventually died out when the railroad stopped running in 1947.

    What’s Left?

    If you’re searching for abandoned towns in the American West, you’ll want to stop in at Whitney, Oregon. This unincorporated community is located in Baker County, Oregon, on the North Fork Burnt River. It’s near the Blue Mountains and Wallowa-Whitman National Forest. You can get lost in this town and take in the historic buildings and structures that are a remnant of a bygone era.


    2. Friend

    45.34682, -121.26706
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    Friend was named after its founder, George J. Friend. It served as a hub for loggers, farmers, and sheepherders. It also served as the end of the Great Southern Railroad line, which extended from Dufur to The Dalles. The town’s one-room schoolhouse and general store still stand on a bustling street, while a cemetery is partially hidden behind a grove of trees.

    What’s Left?

    If you’re planning a trip to Oregon, you’ll likely be interested in visiting the quaint town of Friend. This abandoned railroad town is the last stop on a 41 mile stretch of the Great Southern Railroad. Although the town has almost no remaining structures, it’s still worth visiting. Friend features an old general store, one-room schoolhouse, and cemetery. In addition to its history, it also offers the rare chance to visit a real life ghost town.


    3. Bull Run

    45.42835, -122.23318
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    Founded in 1893, Bull Run was a company town with forty homes and businesses. In addition to the hotel, the town had a gas station, grocery store, blacksmith shop, and blacksmith.

    The town also had the amenities of a modern town, including a school, blacksmith shop, and grocery store. In 1909, the Mt. Hood Railway and Power Company opened a three-story headquarters, and a lake called Roslyn Lake was formed to store the water used in the power-generating process. The water was diverted through wooden flumes and canals to produce electricity.

    What’s Left?

    The town is now a ghost town, but the historic buildings still remain. The old mills, which still stand today, are a great place to go on a ghost tour or just take pictures. You can explore an old concrete mill, a crib elevator, and the mill itself.


    4. Latourell

    45.54052, -122.22097
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    Located less than half a mile downstream of the famous Latourell Falls, Latourell, Oregon was once a bustling river town. Founded by Joseph Latourell in the late 1800s, the town served as a lumber and railroad stop, as well as a community center for Columbia Gorge travelers. It is now a ghost town, and the last remaining residents are a few curious tourists.

    Before it was abandoned, Latourell was a thriving town. There were many businesses here, including a cheese shop and creamery. The town was home to about a dozen two-story buildings and several houses along Falls Creek. The town even had its own brass band! In the late 1800s, it was one of the few towns in the United States that still retains the charm of its past.

    What’s Left?

    The 1880s building still contains most of its original windows, and the shingles are still securely attached to the roof. It is visible from the road and is surrounded by brush so it won’t be too hard to find. The Latourell family, which settled in Latourell, helped build the town’s schoolhouse. The two-room structure had a second story that served as a dance hall, and later generations used it for skating.


    5. Granite

    44.80931, -118.41772
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    Dearfield was built by Oliver Jackson who had the intention of making it an African slave settlement. The place has a stark colonial history. It was difficult to establish a community here but once established, the place gave a profit through agriculture. Hence, it is named so. ‘dear’ suggests the precious value this land holds. During the great depression of 1920, the place suffered economically. It was so economically crippling that Jackson put it on sale but nobody bought it.

    What’s Left?

    Finally, it was abandoned when the owner died in 1948. Today, it has a historic value as an all-black settlement. There is a monument that shares the story of the past, a gas station, and a few cabins have survived.


    6. Millican

    43.87916, -120.91889
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    The town was founded by George Millican who founded the town by himself during the late 1800s. By 1913, a post office was erected and the settlement was officially a town. Over the years the population would decline, until only one resident lived in town and managed the post office. The town’s population was nearly zero when a parolee from the Oregon State Penitentiary killed Bill Mellin, the last remaining resident.

    What’s Left?

    While a town like Millican, Oregon may not be as picturesque as its neighbor, Tiller, Oregon, the area surrounding Millican is no less desolate. Despite its remote location, Millican is home to several abandoned buildings, including an old storefront that’s littered with rat droppings and has numerous holes in its roof.


    7. Bourne

    44.82444, -118.19639
    Status: Abandoned

    P^hoto Credit: Larry Myhre – flickr.com

    History:

    The town of Bourne is a prime example of an early mining ghost town. The town was founded in 1888, and was surrounded by some of the best properties for mining in eastern Oregon. As a result, the population of Bourne quickly increased. By the 1890s, it had a population of over one thousand people. Today, the town’s only remaining structure is the Chitwood Bridge, which was built across the Yaquina River in 1926.

    What’s Left?

    The town has beautifully weathered buildings and a lively atmosphere. There are many preserved structures scattered across the dense foilage for hikers and explorers to enjoy.


    8. Boyd

    45.48943, -121.08111
    Status: Abandoned

    Photo Credit: Jim Choate – flickr.com

    History:

    If you are interested in visiting a ghost town in the Pacific Northwest, you should definitely check out Boyd, Oregon. This small town was incorporated in 1870 and is about twelve miles southeast of The Dalles.

    A train was once the main form of transportation between Portland and Eugene. During the early 1900s, the Oregon-Washington Railroad and Navigation Company built a track to serve the region.

    The route diverted traffic from Columbia Southern to allow for a faster commute. The railroad eventually shut down in 1966, and the town became a ghost town. In the year 1982, the only train operating through this area was from Portland to Eugene.

    What’s Left?

    It is now mostly deserted, except for a derelict grain elevator and a few weathered buildings. While the town itself is a quaint, sleepy place to visit, it is well worth the trip if you’re interested in seeing what makes this little community stand out from the other ghost towns in Oregon.


    9. Cabell City

    44.89514, -118.36827
    Status: Abandoned

    Photo Credit: Bob Patton – flickr.com

    History:

    Near the North Fork of the John Day River, you can find one of the more interesting ghost towns in Oregon, Cabell City. The city was never really a city at all, it didn’t even have a post office. It was however once home to a gold mine, but now it’s a ghost town.

    What’s Left?

    At an elevation of 5,781 feet, this abandoned town was once bustling with activity.  A look at Google Maps will show you the location, but know driving to the town takes you on a dirt road that can be challenging for two-wheel-drive vehicles. The town is a small detour from the main trail, and is a beautiful spot to explore.


    10. Lime

    44.40666, -117.31138
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    If you’re looking for a little bit of history, then look no further than Lime, Oregon. This little town sat right on the Oregon Trail and was first incorporated in 1899.

    By the 1920s, a cement company had turned the lime mines into Portland cement. Lime was a major supplier of the material for the Owyhee Dam. Cement production continued in Lime until the 1970s, when the cement plant was moved to Durkee, where it is still active today.

    What’s Left?

    The Lime factory closed in the 1980s, leaving the small town in ruin. The crumbling machinery, walls and ceilings were splattered with graffiti, making the area seem artful.

    Sharp edges remained, making it hard to get around town. The walls and floors were unstable, and the walls and ceilings lacked support. The entire atmosphere felt haunted. This is what makes Lime so eerie – a little bit fascinating.


    11. Susanville

    44.71333, -118.78278
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    The first of my two ghost towns tours took me to the ghost town of Galena, Oregon. The town is located on the Middle Fork of the John Day River in Malheur National Forest, about 20 miles south of Austin Junction. The town was originally called Susanville, after Susan Ward, one of the town’s earliest residents.

    When the post office was moved there in 1901, Susanville was renamed Galena in honor of the body of galena ore found in the area. The mining operations began in the 1860s and continued until the 1940s, when the town was considered a ghost town.

    What’s Left?

    After mining stopped, the town was abandoned, but not before its post office was stolen in 1901. Although the town has an interesting history, its fate is unknown. There are no records of its last postmaster, and the town only had brief mentions in the newspapers.

    Eventually, the town was relocated two miles up Elk Creek to Galena, where a post office operated until 1943. Eventually, the town’s population dropped below the level of the surrounding area and a new post office was established in Galena.


    12. Eureka Bar

    45.81852, -116.76905
    Status: Barren

    Photo Credit: Ross V Walker – hisandhersphoto.com

    History:

    If you’re a fan of the great outdoors, you may want to head to Eureka Bar, a ghost town located near the confluence of the Imnaha and Snake rivers. Founded in 1889, the town was built on the influx of copper from the surrounding area. The town’s name derived from the fact that the town’s copper mines were located near the confluence of these two rivers. While the town was once bustling, the mines went bust and the area became a ghost town.

    What’s Left?

    Today, the town is visible from boat, or after a large hike as no roads lead to the town anymore. Only ruins remain of Eureka Bar, making it one of the less exciting ghost towns in Oregon.


    13. Fort Rock Homestead Village

    43.3555, -121.05856
    Status: Historic

    History:

    The Fort Rock Homestead Museum was established in 1988. It’s comprised of thirteen buildings, each displaying its own history. Visitors can explore a variety of exhibits and learn about the life of the early Oregonians. The museum is open to the public from May to October. This museum features an assortment of artifacts and historical documents that tell the story of the Fort Rock Valley.

    What’s Left?

    Today, anyone can tour the remnants of old Oregon making this one of the best ghost towns in Oregon to explore with your family.


    14. Shaniko

    45.00355, -120.75257
    Status: Historic

    Photo Credit: Rob Sneed – flickr.com

    History:

    The Shaniko ghost town is one of Oregon’s most unusual and mysterious places. Located in the remote mountains, it is the only town in the world where shepherds and cattlemen fought each other. In 1884, a group of businessmen wanted to move their wool production to the west, and a railroad depot was constructed in the town.

    What’s Left?

    Despite the lack of infrastructure, the town’s claim to fame was its wool, and its wool barn still stands today, at one-third of its original size. Other historical buildings include the Shaniko Schoolhouse, built in 1901 to serve grades kindergarten to high school. It is also home to the Shaniko Hotel, built in 1900 and still with 18-inch-thick walls.


    15. Golden

    42.6825, -123.33028
    Status: Historic

    History:

    The Ruble family owned land in the area and patented a hydraulic elevator. The family then bought land with their success and settled in Golden in 1890. After a few decades, the town’s population began to decline. Residents built multiple homes and two churches during its lifetime. The town was abandoned in the 1920s, but it still retains traces of its past.

    What’s Left?

    Once a thriving mining town, Golden soon faded away as the gold dried up. Despite its ghostly past, the town remains a place of interest and eerie wonder.


    16. Buncom

    42.17416, -122.99694
    Status: Historic

    History:

    The Buncom ghost town in southern Oregon is the most southern of the many ghost towns in the state. The town of Buncom contains just three buildings and the Buncom Historical Society believes that there’s much more to the town than meets the eye.

    Despite its eerie atmosphere, the town remains a popular destination for paranormal enthusiasts. The town was founded in 1851 by Chinese workers to work in the gold mines. Today, the town is almost completely vacant, but the buildings still carry the memories of the past.

    What’s Left?

    Although the town was not permanently abandoned, visitors can still appreciate the architecture of the former gold mining communities. Buncom is definitely one of the more unique ghost towns in Oregon, so be sure to check it out if you’re nearby.


    17. Hardman

    45.1707, -119.68238
    Status: Semi-Abandoned

    History:

    f you’re looking for a unique place to visit on a weekend, you may want to consider the Hardman ghost town in Morrow County, Oregon. The town’s history is one of neglect, with the majority of residents leaving after 1885 and fewer businesses opening. Before the railroad came to town, Hardman was a stagecoach depot, but that soon disappeared when the railroad was built. Other notable structures include general stores, churches, a saloon, and a newspaper station. Hardman has undergone a number of name changes throughout its history.

    Before Hardman was named after its founder, it was called Dairyville. The town was named after the man who homesteaded the site. With the development of new transportation methods, it was soon forgotten about.

    What’s Left?

    Now, it is a spooky place to visit at night, and you’ll be astonished to learn how people lived there for so many years. I personally find it a peaceful place during the daytime, making it a simple and easy place to explore.


    18. Lonerock

    45.08902, -119.88307
    Status: Semi-Abandoned

    History:

    Lonerock, Oregon, is a remote and undeveloped town in Gilliam County, Oregon, located twenty miles (39 km) east of the city of Condon. Its population was 21 at the 2010 census. In 1878, the town was plagued by a massive Native American revolt. Many of the settlers fled to The Dalles, where the US Army stepped in to protect the surviving residents. Lonerock was incorporated in 1882 and Postmaster RG Robinson was elected mayor of its newly formed government.

    What’s Left?

    By 1900, the population of Lonerock was only 68. The town’s economy was based on sheep farming, which gradually declined because of fluctuating prices. As the cost of sheep production dropped, the town’s economy changed to cattle raising.

    The lush grasses on the surrounding hillsides allowed cattle to thrive and now constitute almost all of the town’s economy. Hay production was another important component of the town’s economy, and the introduction of irrigation methods helped to grow alfalfa.


    19. Antelope

    44.91068, -120.72281
    Status: Semi-Abandoned

    History:

    There is a history behind Antelope, one of the few surviving ghost towns in Oregon. This community was established in the early 1800s as a connection between Columbia River gold mines and Canyon City, and had a population of 47 in 2012. The town was first settled in 1872, and its namesake was a herd of antelopes that lived in the area. In the early 1900s, it was incorporated as a town, and grew to over 250 people.

    What’s Left?

    In the 1980s, Antelope, Oregon was threatened with occupation by a religious group . An evangelical group, called the Rajneeshee had planned to turn the town into their comune settlement Luckily, the residents survived the invasion and won their name back. In fact, the town now has a mayor and city council and serves as a historic preservation society that details these events.


    20. Kent

    45.19455, -120.6922
    Status: Semi-Abandoned

    Photo Credit: Scott Smithson – flickr.com

    History:

    Kent is a small community located just south of the famous Shankiko ghost town. Kent was originally called Guthrie, and was primarily a railroad town. Residents literally picked names out of a hat to come up with the name Kent. The name was suggested because it was short and simple to write.

    What’s Left?

    Today there are numberous buildings from Kent’s past, with few active homes and farmers who now call the land home.


    21. Sumpter

    44.7457, -118.20216
    Status: Semi-Abandoned

    History:

    The town got its start in the 1860s, when three Carolinians migrated to Oregon in search of gold. Originally named Fort Sumter, it quickly became a gold mining boomtown in a short time. The town was also located on the Elkhorn Scenic Byway, and many tourists visit for the ghost town experience. In addition to ghost towns, Sumpter is home to several historic preservation projects. The town was named after Fort Sumter in South Carolina, but was later changed to suit the U.S. Post Office.

    What’s Left?

    If you’re looking for a small, charming town in the heart of the Oregon desert, consider visiting Sumpter, Oregon. This town, located thirty miles west of Baker, was once a bustling gold rush town, with over 2,000 residents. Despite its remote location, Sumpter has modern amenities, including sidewalks, churches, saloons, a brewery, and electric lighting.


    22. Flora

    45.90028, -117.31016
    Status: Semi-Abandoned

    History:

    In Wallowa County, Oregon, there is an unincorporated community called Flora. It is situated 35 miles north of Enterprise on Oregon Route 3 and has six mines. Today, it is considered a ghost town. It is situated at an elevation of 4350 feet. To get an idea of what life was like here, you can visit the town’s cemetery. The town was founded in 1891, and the frontiersman who founded it donated a corner of his homestead for this purpose.

    What’s Left?

    Today there are numerous abandoned buildings scattered along the roadside but don’t be surprised to see other people. Flora is home to a small dedicated community who are working to preserve their local schoolhouse as an arts center.


    Go out and explore!

    That concludes our list of ghost towns in Oregon, but that doesn’t mean that’s all there is to find. Take the back roads, follow train tracks, and find some places for yourself. There are plenty of places I kept off this list so get out there and explore.

    If you’re having trouble finding ghost towns be sure to check out our Ultimate Guide to Finding Abandoned Places, or explore other ghost towns across the country.