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15 Ghost Towns In Ohio [MAP]

    ghost towns in Ohio

    If you’re searching for ghost towns in Ohio, we’ve got you covered! Below are 15 different ghost towns you can explore across the great state of Ohio along with their status and exact GPS coordinates.

    We rate ghost towns in Ohio based on their status. Here’s how our system works:

    • Abandoned: Is abandoned with ruins and structures in a decayed state. Great for urban explorers.
    • Historic: Preservation efforts have been made and sometimes plaques installed. Great for everyone.
    • Barren: Almost nothing remains of the town. Ideal for metal detectorists.
    • Commercial: Is commercially owned with amenities, restaurants, and stores. Great for families.
    • Semi-Abandoned: Abandoned areas with a small population in the area.
    • Privately Owned: Tours might be available but not open to the general public.


    1. Helltown

    41.26673, -81.55985
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    If you’ve ever visited Ohio, you’ve undoubtedly heard of Helltown. It’s an unincorporated community located in Summit County. There is a tiny white church in the center of Helltown, which has been the subject of several theories.

    Some believe the church was a gathering place for Satanists, and that they still haunt the town. Others think that Satanists still hang out in the area, recruiting unwelcome visitors. The town was also the site of a chemical spill, which caused strange mutations in the local population and a mass evacuation. While those stories are fun to believe, they are not even close to true. Helltown had a pretty unassuming history, with no mutants or demons.

    What’s Left?

    Today, Helltown remains one of the most infamous ghost towns in Ohio despite the lack of structures left. You can find an old bus tucked away in the woods and an old white church. Since the area gained popularity online authorities pressed the city to demolish its remaining abandoned buildings.


    2. Moonville

    39.3077, -82.32322
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    The town was founded in 1849 when logging and coal mining operations began popping up in the area. Samuel Coe donated land to build a railroad to cut the distance between Moonville and Cincinnati. He also owned a general store in the area, which inspired the town’s name. Moonville also boasted a school, tavern, hotel, and a few residences. The ghost town of Moonville was officially abandoned in 1947, when the last resident left the town.

    What’s Left?

    A small overgrown cemetery and the infamous Moonville tunnel is all that remains of Moonville. There have been reports of paranormal activity inside the Moonville tunnel for close to 100 years, making it one of the most haunted ghost towns in Ohio on this list.


    3. Cheshire

    38.9448, -82.10988
    Status:
    Abandoned

    paranormal-cheshire-ohio
    Photo Credit: Carleta Latham – flickr.com

    History:

    Cheshire was abandoned after the nearby coal plant polluted the air, groundwater, and soil after operating without restraint. In the 1970s, hospital administrator Bob Lucas served as part-time mayor of the ghost town of Cheshire. He allegedly kept getting re-elected because no one else wanted to take the heat.

     Residents began complaining of coughing, scratchy eyes, sore throats, and headaches. In 2001, the utility company, American Electric Power, began installing new emissions control equipment. The new equipment resulted in blue clouds of sulfuric acid drifting into the town which created acid rain – an entirely new problem.

    What’s Left?

    The remaining 12 residents are trapped in a long waiting game with the power company AEP. AEP will automatically buy the land if residents do not move.

    They felt like they were being robbed of their land. There are few remnants left behind but it won’t be long before AEP gains control over the rest of the land and wipes Cheshire from the map. Given its history, Cheshire stands to be one of the most polluted ghost towns in Ohio. Stay safe!


    4. Kyger

    38.98107, -82.15567
    Status: Abandoned

    ohio-ghost-town-cheshire

    History:

    Before 1880, this town was known as Aleshire. The name comes from the family that lived there. The Alexanders lived in Gallia and Meigs Counties during the 1800s, and many of the towns were named for them. In addition to the ghost town, there are several graves of early Ohio residents. Some of these graves are located in Mound Hill Cemetery in Gallipolis, which is 35 miles south of Oreton on SR 160.

    What’s Left?

    Kyger’s population has declined as the region is less reliant on coal, and residents have fled the area after finding themselves in a similar situation to the neighboring town of Cheshire. If you like abandoned homes, old cemeteries, and cooling towers in your background shots, Kyger is the place for you.


    5. Broadwell

    39.366, -81.88072
    Status: Abandoned

    Photo Credit: ohioghosttowns.org

    History:

    The small town of Broadwell, Ohio, is located 12 miles west of Springfield and was founded by Moses Broadwell, a Revolutionary War veteran. The Broadwell family had many properties, including a tavern and store, which provided essential supplies and income to the community. A tannery ledger shows that twelve men worked in the tannery, which supplied leather to farmers, bootmakers, and harness makers.

    What’s Left?

    Today explorers can find various abandoned homes, a few old cemeteries, and overgrown ruins from the original town.


    6. Sewellsville

    40.09778, -81.21424
    Status: Abandoned

    Photo Credit: findagrave.com

    History:

    Sewellsville used to be called Union and was first settled in 1815. The town was always modest and only lasted until 1907. After the name change, the town was named after the first postmaster, Peter Sewell.

    What’s Left?

    While there are certainly more exciting ghost towns in Ohio, Sewellsville still offers explorers old historic structures, and a very old cemetery.


    7. San Toy

    39.63503, -82.034
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    The town of San Toy was once a bustling community in the early 20th century. Sunday Creek Coal Company was responsible for creating the town. As the coal trade declined, the town became an increasingly desolate place. The Sunday Creek Coal Company closed its mines in San Toy, and residents were forced to relocate.

    What’s Left?

    Today, San Toy remains a ghost town, untouched by time. The ruins of San Toy’s mining past are still visible. The town is comprised of three buildings: the church, a jail, and a water well pump house. Three of these buildings have lost their roofs, but the walls and foundations are still standing.

    While the town is no longer inhabited, many former residents still meet regularly to reminisce about their time here. There’s a Broadway musical based on the town’s history called “San Toy” and the coal firm invested in it.


    8. Utopia

    38.77611, -84.05722
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    Utopia, Ohio was the site of three distinctive communal experiments, each with different objectives. One of these communities was the social movement inspired by Charles Fourier. Another utopian community was led by protoanarchist Josiah Warren, a spiritualistic/abolitionist, and anarchist John O. Wattles. The utopian movement lasted for over two decades, before fading into obscurity.

    What’s Left?

    Only a handful of people live in Utopia, making it one of the strangest ghost towns in Ohio. While there’s not much left the unique story behind the town makes it worth a visit if you’re nearby.


    9. Wonderland

    40.00293, -82.87046
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    Near Gahanna, Ohio, near a bend in Big Walnut Creek, there was a small community of summer cottages called Wonderland. Many of these summer cottages were winterized and became year-round homes during the Depression. After the airport was built nearby, demand plummeted for these cottages leaving the community empty.

    What’s Left?

    Today, this community is a quaint reminder of an idyllic past with nothing but dead-end streets and overgrown roads crisscrossing the land.


    10. Tadmoor Village

    39.88001, -84.16784
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    he town was situated near a river, and two houses were located near the river. The National Road was the National Highway of the century, but it never made any money. As more transportation routes became available in the area, Tadmor’s population began to decline and the area subsequently became a ghost town. The town became totally abandoned by 1922.

    What’s Left?

    he town became a popular tourist destination after the 1980s, when rumors of a haunted village began to spread. Visitors reported hearing voices, seeing strange shadows in the woods, and even noticing iridescent buildings. The area was a dumping ground for trash, and became increasingly creepy. Tales of devil worshipers and hermits began to circulate.

    Outside of the folklore, nothing but stone ruins remain of the town.


    11. Laceyville

    40.32198, -81.13171
    Status: Barren

    History:

     Laceyville was founded in the 1800s on the site of the ancient Tappan Lake, and was named for a military officer who defended the region. The town’s post office was established in 1850, but closed down by 1907. The town was completely flooded locals created Tappan Lake.

    What’s Left?

    The remnants of Lacevyille are now underwater. Divers have claimed that there are still ruins of an old house, but it is only accessible via underwater exploration.


    12. Shawnee

    39.60525, -82.21136
    Status: Semi-Abandoned

    History:

    You can visit many ghost towns in the Midwest, but few of them have the same character and charm as Shawnee, Ohio. This town is largely abandoned with no downtown business, although you’ll still find people living there. In fact, social media users often refer to it as a “modern ghost town.” Many photographers have come to capture the town’s spirit. If these efforts pay off, the local community might be able to maintain its charm and attract visitors.

    What’s Left?

    In addition to its ghost town history, Shawnee has undergone a rash of crimes, including a recent opiate problem. The town has been the site of a number of robberies and even the death of a former local shop owner. Despite this, Shawnee is one of the best-preserved ghost towns in Ohio and is well worth a trip to check out.


    13. Belmore

    41.15407, -83.9415
    Status: Semi-Abandoned

    History:

    Belmore is a small modern ghost town in Ohio with a population of about 100. The area was settled in 1862 and lasted until 1964 but never surpassed a population of 500.

    What’s Left?

    Belmore is still a quaint little town, with various structures and a historic church for visitors to see. While its not worth driving too far to see Belmore, check it out if you’re nearby.


    14. Rendville

    39.61951, -82.09097
    Status: Semi-Abandoned

    History:

    The history of Rendville is complex and the town has seen its fair share of history. Rendville was one of the first coal mining towns in southern Ohio to integrate black and white workers. The town grew from a handful of black men to a population of almost 1800 in the late 1880s, which included about 300 African Americans. The African American community continued to thrive in Rendville.

    What’s Left?

    Though the town’s history is largely forgotten, its contributions are notable. Rendville produced a notable labor organizer, the first African American mayor of the state, and the first African American woman postmistress in the country. It was also the birthplace of Adam Clayton Powell, Sr., the first black pastor in Ohio. The town was home to Ohio’s first female postmaster and Roberta Preston, the first African American woman to hold that position.


    15. Moscow

    38.85701, -84.2291
    Status: Semi-Abandoned

    History:

     This village was established in 1816 by Daniel and William Green, who were descendants of Revolutionary War veterans Benjamin and Catharine. The town’s name may have come from French immigrants, who first settled in the area. In 1866, the town was listed by name in the county atlas, but by 1881, a county history book described it as “nearly dead.”

    What’s Left?

    Moscow has one of the most unique names of all the ghost towns in Ohio, and has various abandoned buildings and historic structures to explore.



    Go out and explore!

    That concludes our list of ghost towns in Ohio, but that doesn’t mean that’s all there is to find. Take the back roads, follow train tracks, and find some places for yourself. There are plenty of places I kept off this list so get out there and explore.

    If you’re having trouble finding ghost towns be sure to check out our Ultimate Guide to Finding Abandoned Places, or explore other ghost towns across the country.