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10 Ghost Towns In Louisiana [MAP]

    ghost towns in Louisiana

    If you’re searching for ghost towns in Louisiana, we’ve got you covered! Below are 10 different ghost towns you can explore across Louisiana along with their status and exact GPS coordinates.

    We rate ghost towns in Louisiana based on their status. Here’s how our system works:

    • Abandoned: Is abandoned with ruins and structures in a decayed state. Great for urban explorers.
    • Historic: Preservation efforts have been made and sometimes plaques installed. Great for everyone.
    • Barren: Almost nothing remains of the town. Ideal for metal detectorists.
    • Commercial: Is commercially owned with amenities, restaurants, and stores. Great for families.
    • Semi-Abandoned: Abandoned areas with a small population in the area.
    • Privately Owned: Tours might be available but not open to the general public.


    1. Burrwood

    28.96662, -89.37977
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

     In the 1880s, this town was a thriving exporter of cotton and sugar cane. However, a devastating flood in 1884 destroyed much of the town and displaced the residents.

    What’s Left?

    Today, the only evidence that people once lived in this town is the two-room schoolhouse and a row of abandoned buildings. Burrwood is one of many ghost towns in Louisiana that have been devastated and abandoned due to flooding.


    2. Frenier

    30.1077, -90.42675
    Status: Abandoned

    Photo Credit: ChilliDogMe – reddit.com

    History:

    The story of Frenier is intriguing. In the early twentieth century, there was a woman named Julia Brown who was reputed to be a witch. She lived in a small town called Frenier. She performed many rituals in the village, including those for childbirth, fighting off infections, and curing illnesses. People would visit Julia to receive supernatural healing from Julia, and they recovered quickly from her spells.

    In 1915, a hurricane destroyed Frenier, Louisiana, killing more than fifty people. Local legend has it that the town was cursed by the Voodoo priestess Many believe that she cursed the town and took its inhabitants with her when she died.

    What’s Left?

     The town’s buildings are overgrown with vegetation and decaying wood. You can still see the grave markers of those who died, along with the grave of the alleged witch. Of all the ghost towns in Louisiana, Frenier is clearly the most haunted.


    3. Portlock

    31.41027, -93.29026
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    Peason’s history dates back to the late 19th century. It was founded by two lumbermen named Riley J. Peavy and A.J. Peavy, who combined their expertise to build a lumber mill in the area. The lumber mill helped the community to grow to nearly 2000 people. In addition to the lumber mill, there were churches, schools, and many other structures.

    What’s Left?

    The town was home to a sawmill and is located on Highway 118 in Sabine Parish. It is located 8.7 miles east of Hornbeck. It is a popular tourist destination. You can explore the ruins and learn about the town’s history on a ghost town tour, or simply wander around for yourself.


    4. Ruddock

    30.20559, -90.42278
    Status: Abandoned

    Photo Credit: Mr. Greenjeans – reddit.com

    History:

    This area suffered many hurricanes over the years. There were several villages that attempted to settle in the area, but were unsuccessful.

    Louisiana was admitted into the Union as the 18th state on April 30, 1812. While it is unknown exactly when Ruddock was established, historians estimate that it was founded by the 19th century. The German colonists who settled in the region were plagued by yellow fever, cholera, and malaria.

    What’s Left?

    The town has since disappeared, with the exception of a few ruins of buildings and a railroad exit sign.


    5. Sherburne

    30.51491, -91.719
    Status: Abandoned

    Photo Credit: cajuntravel.com

    History:

    The town was once a thriving community that consisted of many buildings and businesses. The community had a two-room schoolhouse, a bakery, and a post office. There were also churches and a lumber mill that are unfortunately no longer standing. Many of the original structures were abandoned in the 1930s due to lack of timber. 

    In 1958, the Dow Chemical Company began producing vinyl chloride, a chemical that polluted local water supplies. By the 1980s, residents of the town were forced to sell their homes to the company in fear of lawsuits.

    What’s Left?

    Today, the only remaining structures are a cemetery and a historic marker.


    6. Bayou Corne

    30.01505, -91.15565
    Status: Barren

    History:

    Bayou Corne was once a quaint fishing town, but by August 2, 2012, it had been completely destroyed. When the sinkhole first began to eat it, residents began to notice bubbles and oil coming out of a pit nearby. Soon the area with thankfully abandoned structures was swallowed whole.

    What’s Left?

    Today there is almost nothing left. Bayou Corne is one of the few ghost towns in Louisiana to be completed destroyed by a sinkhole.


    7. East Krotz Springs

    30.53723, -91.73697
    Status: Barren

    History:

    The town had a rich history as a lumbering center, but it died slowly as the Mississippi River rose. It was struck twice by the same levee, once in 1912 and once in 1973, and again in 2011 when floodgates were opened to relieve the high water levels. 

    What’s Left?

    Today, there is no trace of the town’s previous life, or the buildings that were once there. In addition, the ghostly presence of General John A. Quitman, who bought the town in 1826, is said to haunt the area. Some people have claimed to have spotted him in full uniform.


    8. La Balize

    29.1225, -89.10722
    Status: Barren

    History:

    The ghost town of La Balize is located in Plaquemines Parish. This low-lying swampy area is prone to hurricanes. The town was destroyed by a hurricane in 1740. It was rebuilt in the island of San Carlos, but the island was also destroyed several times. The town was finally moved five miles upstream to a new location in the Southwest Pass in 1853.

    What’s Left?

    Today there’s almost nothing left outside of partially submerged ruins.


    9. Alma

    30.59629, -91.38955
    Status: Semi-Abandoned

    History:

    In the 18th century, the town of Alma was settled by Julien de Lallande Poydras. In 1789, he founded a sugar mill there. He first visited the Caribbean in the late 1760s, and saw the success of sugar mills in Saint-Domingue. He decided to move to Alma to expand his business.

    The town was originally named Cheniere Caminada. Lallande arrived in the area when Louisiana was under Spanish rule. Afterward, he established a sugar mill and plantation in Alma.

    What’s Left?

    Today, the town’s population is less than 50. Visitors can tour the sugar mill and plantation, as well as a general store.


    10. Fisher

    31.49378, -93.46573
    Status: Semi-Abandoned

    History:

    Fisher was settled in 1889 as a company town for the Louisiana Long Leaf Lumber Company. The town was purchased by the Boise Cascade Corporation in 1966 where the business steadily declined and eventually failed.

    What’s Left?

    Today, Fisher is home to various historic structures, and a few abandoned homes. The Fisher First Baptist church is also a notable building to check out while you’re in town.


    Go out and explore!

    That concludes our list of ghost towns in Louisiana but that doesn’t mean that’s all there is to find. Take the back roads, follow train tracks, and find some places for yourself. There are plenty of places I kept off this list so get out there and explore.

    If you’re having trouble finding ghost towns be sure to check out our Ultimate Guide to Finding Abandoned Places, or explore other ghost towns across the country.