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13 Ghost Towns In Indiana [MAP]

    Ghost Towns In Indiana

    If you’re searching for ghost towns in Indiana, we’ve got you covered! Below are 13 different ghost towns you can explore across the great state of Indiana along with their status and exact GPS coordinates.

    We rate ghost towns in Indiana based on their status. Here’s how our system works:

    • Abandoned: Is abandoned with ruins and structures in a decayed state. Great for urban explorers.
    • Historic: Preservation efforts have been made and sometimes plaques installed. Great for everyone.
    • Barren: Almost nothing remains of the town. Ideal for metal detectorists.
    • Commercial: Is commercially owned with amenities, restaurants, and stores. Great for families.
    • Semi-Abandoned: Abandoned areas with a small population in the area.
    • Privately Owned: Tours might be available but not open to the general public.


    1. Dunn

    40.563889, -87.463889
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    Dunn is one of the first ghost towns in Indiana we’ll be touching on in this list. Established in 1907, Dunn was named after Captain James Dunn and featured two stores, a grain elevator, and about six homes. Since Dunn lacked an abundance of natural resources, the town quickly dissolved by 1913.

    What’s Left?

    Today not much remains of the town of Dunn. Explorers can check out the old grain silo that sits right next two the miles of overgrown rail line pointing south.


    2. Brisco

    40.414401, -87.349888
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    The town of Brisco started off in the 1850s as a small hamlet with a single-room schoolhouse and a general store. The town disappeared in the 1930s, with even USGS maps dropping it completely.

    What’s Left?

    Today the only traces of Brisco are the graves of the first settlers located northeast of town.


    3. Sloan

    40.301667, -87.476111
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    Sloan was founded more than a century ago, and it was a thriving town for 40 years.  his smaTll town sprang up in the mid-19th century as a rail junction. The railroad continued to run through Sloan until the 1950s, when it officially ceased operation.

    What’s Left?

    This ghost town is less than one-half hour by car from Louisville and two hours from Indianapolis. While the town has few surviving buildings, you can explore the soil for interesting artifacts. Coins and railway tools are common, and urban explorers can find some interesting artifacts.


    4. Elizabethtown

    43.162408, -89.838679
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    Elizabethtown was centered around Joseph Wilson’s Elizabeth Mill and Uriah Power’s general store. This quaint little town sat just north of Mississinewa on County Roads 370 West and 1270 North. There was also a schoolhouse, sawmill, Presbyterian church, and a covered bridge, but no one seems to remember it. At the time of its closure, there were 504 residents.

    What’s Left?

    This small town had high hopes for being the county seat, but eventually, it was abandoned and is still mostly a cemetery. Some people believe that the cemetery is haunted by the spirits of its early residents. While visiting the town, be sure to bring your flashlight and a camera!


    5. Granville

    40.407107, -87.031357
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    Granville was founded by Thomas W. Treckett and Thomas Concannon in 1834. The town thrived as a shipping hub, utilizing the canal until the 1850s when the railroad stole most of the transport business. With this decline in business, the town slowly declined until it was completely abandoned in 1878.

    What’s Left?

    While Granville isn’t the most exciting of ghost towns in Indiana, explorers can still find the cemetery east of town right next to the Wabash River.


    6. Baltimore

    40.165833, -87.441944
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    Baltimore was established in 1829 but never grew past 70 residents. A store was opened in 1839 which was able to transport goods along the Wabash and Erie Canal. When the railroad came through town, businesses along the canal sharply decline along with the population.

    What’s Left?

    Today outside the cemetery, the only surviving structure from Baltimore is an old brick house from the 1880s.


    7. Corwin

    40.251389, -86.914444
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    When it was first laid out in 1856, Corwin consisted of seven lots near the railroad. The town never grew beyond this point, and its post office was closed in 1915.

    What’s Left?

    Explorers can still find an old grain silo and a local cemetery in the area.


    8. Elkinsville

    39.076111, -86.264722
    Status: Abandoned

    Photo Credit: mspetersen – manyfoto.com

    History:

    This unincorporated town was once a bustling farming community, but has since been abandoned during the construction of Lake Monroe Reservoir. Once bustling, Elkinsville once had a general store, blacksmith shop, grocery store, and church. The US Army Corps Engineers planned the construction of Lake Monroe Reservoir, and it turned out that Elkinsville would be located in the middle of the floodplain.

    What’s Left?

    One of the things to see in Elkinsville is the cemetery. A small cemetery has a few gravestones of families who once inhabited the town. These graves are all that remain of the once prosperous community.


    9. Hindostan Falls

    38.624444, -86.850833
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    Hindostan Falls was once a vibrant center of commerce. A little over two centuries ago, Hindostan Falls was a bustling community in Martin County, Indiana.

    This town, named for a British soldier who served in India, had a population of about 1200. It was the largest settlement in the state, and it boasted two mills, a hotel, a post office, and a whetstone factory. The town also had houseboats and a whetstone factory.

    What’s Left?

    Today there are numerous abandoned buildings, and the old cemetery to see. Of all the ghost towns in Indiana, Hindostan Falls is among the most remote in the state.


    10. Marshfield

    38.709167, -85.781667
    Status: Semi-Abandoned

    History:

    Marshfield was first established in 1857, with the population reaching 150 by 1870. By the 1900s, the town had grown to 250 residents. The town boasted a hotel, three churches, a drug store, and a grain warehouse.

    What’s Left?

    Today explorers can find various ruins along the railroad. While this isn’t the most genuine ghost town in Indiana, it certainly has a creepy small town vibe at night.


    11. Springville

    38.4275, -85.686944
    Status: Barren

    History:

    Springville was settled all the way back in 1833. The town was directly on the Michigan Road, which was vital for travel and commerce. The town had a mill, schoolhouse, shoemaker, general store, and two churches. When the Pere Marquette Railroad was built, many abandoned the roadway for the new high-speed rail system.

    What’s Left?

    Today, the original town of Springville is all but gone. Only a few graves and the documented history keep the town’s memory alive.


    12. Tremont

    41.648611, -87.043611
    Status: Barren

    History:

    Tremont was settled in the early 1830s as a railroad stop and became all but abandoned by 1930. During its peak, the town had a sawmill, copper shop, a brickyard, and about 20 or so homes.

    What’s Left?

    Today, you can barely see any trace of this town. The surrounding area has Indiana Dunes, a rookery, and farms, as well as numerous recreational opportunities. If you have time, you can also visit the state park and a pioneer-style church. You can enjoy the sunset over the beautiful Indiana dunes. You can also go to the town’s official beach, Waverly Beach.

    13. Mollie

    40.508333, -85.315000
    Status: Privately Owned

    History:

    Mollie was a small town that thrived between 1880 and 1920 during the Indiana Gas Boom. Like many ghost towns in Indiana, the boom and bust of Mollie were centered around a single resource. While natural gas had made Mollie what it was, it ultimately was its demise when the gas was tapped out. This, combined with the shift away from the railroad and toward automobiles cause Mollie to decline.

    What’s Left?

    Nothing is left of the town, and the area is now privately owned by a commercial company.


    Go out and explore!

    That concludes our list of ghost towns in Indiana, but that doesn’t mean that’s all there is to find. Take the back roads, follow train tracks, and find some places for yourself. There are plenty of places I kept off this list so get out there and explore.

    If you’re having trouble finding ghost towns be sure to check out our Ultimate Guide to Finding Abandoned Places, or explore other ghost towns across the country.

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