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10 Ghost Towns In Connecticut [MAP]

    ghost towns in Connecticut

    If you’re searching for ghost towns in Connecticut, we’ve got you covered! Below are 10 different ghost towns you can explore across Connecticut along with their status and exact GPS coordinates.

    We rate ghost towns in Connecticut based on their status. Here’s how our system works:

    • Abandoned: Is abandoned with ruins and structures in a decayed state. Great for urban explorers.
    • Historic: Preservation efforts have been made and sometimes plaques installed. Great for everyone.
    • Barren: Almost nothing remains of the town. Ideal for metal detectorists.
    • Commercial: Is commercially owned with amenities, restaurants, and stores. Great for families.
    • Semi-Abandoned: Abandoned areas with a small population in the area.
    • Privately Owned: Tours might be available but not open to the general public.


    1. Johnsonville Village

    41.4950, -72.4665
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    The community began in the late nineteenth century as a small mill town. The Neptune Mill, built in 1832, utilized the power of the nearby river.

    A couple of years later, a mill named the Triton Mill was built. The community expanded around the mills, which included several buildings, tenements, and a famous Victorian chapel. Unfortunately, the mills eventually closed down, and in the 1980s, the town began to fall into disrepair.

    The town was later purchased by a mysterious businessman, who tried to turn it into a tourist attraction. But his efforts failed and the town continued to decay.

    What’s Left?

    Today, the only evidence that people once lived in this town is the two-room schoolhouse and a row of abandoned buildings. Burrwood is one of many ghost towns in Louisiana that have been devastated and abandoned due to flooding.


    2. Gay City State Park

    41.7225, -72.4362
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    The Gay City State Park features an old ghost town not many know about. Though there aren’t many remnants of the old mill, the town once was a thriving community. It was originally known as Factory Hollow, but when the Gay family sold the land to the state, it was renamed Gay City. You can also visit the cemetery where many old gravestones are still in place. The inscriptions still make it possible to read the names of the dead.

    What’s Left?

    Today Gay City is part of the State Park. Explorers can take several paths that crisscross among the old stone ruins of the town. While most ghost towns in Connecticut are isolated, this town is easy to visit and not far from main roads.


    3. Stamford’s Miniature Ghost Town

    31.41027, -93.29026
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

     While it is not entirely scary, this small town does have a few eerie attractions, including a former summer camp, Twin Lakes. This camp closed several years ago, but some people claim that a ghost haunts it.

    What’s Left?

    The old storefronts can be found under US 95. While these are some of the oldest buildings in the area, they are being threatened with demolition by the city.


    4. Bara-Hack

    41.8800, -72.0110
    Status: Abandoned

    Photo Credit: Mr. Greenjeans – reddit.com

    History:

    Bara-Hack is located in Pomfret, Connecticut and has been a ghost town for over 125 years. It was founded by two men, Johnathan Randall and Obadiah Higginbotham, who moved from Cranston, Rhode Island to settle in Pomfret. Their settlement was named Bara-Hack, which means ‘breaking bread’ in Welsh.

    Although Bara-Hack was never a village, it was a small settlement made up of two farms. One was owned by a Randall family, the other by a Higginbotham family. The two families had lived together for many years, and their descendants owned the farms. The town had a mill and a waterwheel, as well as fine family homes. It was also home to a community graveyard. In addition, slaves told tales of a ghostly baby that lived in a tree nearby.

    What’s Left?

    Today, only the base of the houses remains. While the official name of this town is “Bara-Hack,” many people also refer to it as the “Village of Voices” or the “Village of Lost Voices.” Of all the ghost towns in Connecticut, Bara-Hack may just be the most haunted.


    5. Holy Land USA

    41.5493, -73.0298
    Status:
    Abandoned

    History:

    The Holy Land USA ghost town in Connecticut was founded in the late 1950s and once flourished as a tourist destination. However, after the park’s owner died in 1986, it was closed to the public. Since then, it has become a target for vandals, and in 2010, a murder took place in the area. In order to preserve the historic site for Christian and religious purposes, the current owners have set up a nonprofit that looks after the park.

    What’s Left?

    Despite the damage, visitors to the park still stopped by occasionally to visit the site, but were sure to leave before sundown if you don’t want to get chased down by the nuns.


    6. Pleasure Beach

    41.1634, -73.1666
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    The once-thriving beach town is now a ghost town. The island is 71 acres of land in the Long Island Sound. The only person living on Pleasure Beach is the 33-year-old manager Steve Dawson. The town was abandoned in 1996 after an arson fire destroyed the bridge that connected the mainland to the barrier. At that time, the town had become the largest ghost town in Connecticut.

    What’s Left?

    Today, a revitalization effort has helped bring back the former town to life. The former pleasure beach, which was once a popular tourist attraction, lies on two and a half miles of land, two miles west of Stratford. This beach is surrounded by water on three sides and has not been inhabited for more than 50 years.


    7. Dudleytown

    41.81242, -73.36701
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    While the exact history of Dudleytown is disputed, the area became known as such in the 1740s. The Dudley family settled in the area and built homes. Legend has it that the Dudley family was cursed, and anyone who befriended them would suffer an unsavory fate.

    Crime and unsanitary conditions plagued the town, so many residents abandoned it. The town eventually died out due to infertile soil and no clean water.

    What’s Left?

    Today Dudleytown is one of the most infamous ghost towns in Connecticut. Explorers can see the old brick buildings in town as well as some of the ruins


    8. Hookman’s Cemetary

    41.38329, -73.11873
    Status:
    Barren

    History:

    Hookman’s cemetery is all that remains of an old ghost town located in Seymour area. Not much is known about what used to reside there, but many agree that a mass grave of Native Americans is located just north of the cemetery.

    What’s Left?

    Hookmans Cemetary is a mysterious, haunted place in central Connecticut. Many people have reported seeing ghostly figures, such as soldiers on horseback and laughing children. They have also spotted orbs and streaks of light in photographs. However, the most unsettling reports have come from those who have heard strange sounds coming from the ruins, such as horse drawn buggies, farm animals, or voices.


    9. Vincent Island

    41.03565, -73.51012
    Status: Abandoned

    History:

    During the 1800s, William O. Wyckoff built a mansion on this small island. He made his fortune selling typewriters and decided to build his vacation home in the St. Lawrence River. He hired architect William Henry Miller to design the mansion, which he used as a summer residence. Unfortunately, Wyckoff died in the mansion on his first night there, due to a heart attack.

    What’s Left?

    The island is now home to a few stone ruins that have survived the harsh weather over the years. The island is popular for boaters and those kayaking from the coast.


    Go out and explore!

    That concludes our list of ghost towns in Connecticut but that doesn’t mean that’s all there is to find. Take the back roads, follow train tracks, and find some places for yourself. There are plenty of places I kept off this list so get out there and explore.

    If you’re having trouble finding ghost towns be sure to check out our Ultimate Guide to Finding Abandoned Places, or explore other ghost towns across the country.

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